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No-Cook Breakfast Ideas: Trail Smoothie

trail smoothie

A smoothie is an excellent option for a quick morning meal or a snack on the trail. You can make it in minutes before leaving the campsite and sip it on the go.

What is a smoothie?

A smoothie is a thick shake type drink made from blended fruit or vegetables and other nutrient-dense ingredients such as juices, dairy products or nut butter.

Why is smoothie good for the trail?

  • It’s quick and easy to make. Making a smoothie from powdered/dehydrated ingredients doesn’t take as long as preparing a full breakfast meal, giving you more time to enjoy your adventure.
  • Improves digestion.
    Blending fruits and vegetables together breaks down the cells of plants and unlocks the nutrients to maximize their delivery to your body.
  • Fuels you up for a great day on the trail.
    Since a smoothie is consumed in the most optimum way for digestion and the absorption of nutrients, you’ll have more energy to get things done and enjoy your day.
  • Helps build muscles and improves athletic performance.
    Smoothies provide your body with the nutrients it needs to excel during a long day hike and helps you to recover after physical activity.
  • Helps meet your body’s daily nutritional needs.
    Consuming the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables while you are on a backpacking trip can be a challenge. Having a smoothie is a convenient and great-tasting way to get your daily allowance of fruits and vegetables.

Check out our super-healthy trail smoothie recipes:

Chocolate Almond Smoothie

trail smoothie

You’ll need:
1 banana
2 tablespoons wheat berries or rolled oats
1 tablespoon almond or peanut butter
1 teaspoon ground flaxseed
1 teaspoon cocoa
3/4 cup almond milk

At home:
Combine all the ingredients in a blender.
Process at high speed until smooth and frothy.
Spread on dehydrator tray covered with a non-stick sheet or parchment paper.
Dehydrate at 115F/46C  for about 6-12 hours until completely dry and brittle.
Remove from dehydrator and let cool to room temperature.
Grind dried smoothie mixture in a coffee grinder into a fine powder.
Pack in a small zip lock bag.

On the trail:
Pour smoothie powder into a mug or wide-mouth @Nalgene bottle.
Add 2/3 cup water and stir/shake well.
Let stand for 5 minutes to rehydrate.

Nutrition: 562KCal, Carbs: 44.3g, Fat: 44.4g, Protein: 7.2g, Sodium: 31mg, Sugars: 20.5g, Dietary Fiber: 8.3g
Apx. weight: 40g/1.41oz

Mango Coconut Smoothie

trail smoothie

You’ll need:
1 cup frozen mango chunks
2 tablespoons rolled oats
2 tablespoons shredded coconut, unsweetened
3/4 cup coconut milk

At home:
Combine all the ingredients in a blender.
Process at high speed until smooth and frothy.
Spread on dehydrator tray covered with a non-stick sheet or parchment paper.
Dehydrate at 115F/46C  for about 6-12 hours until completely dry and brittle.
Remove from dehydrator and let cool to room temperature.
Grind dried smoothie mixture in a coffee grinder into a fine powder.
Pack in a small zip lock bag.

On the trail:
Pour smoothie powder into a mug or wide-mouth @Nalgene bottle.
Add 2/3 cup water and stir/shake well.
Let stand for 5 minutes to rehydrate.

Nutrition: 578KCal, Carbs: 42.4g, Fat: 46.9g, Protein: 5.8g, Sodium: 30mg, Sugars: 27.7g, Dietary Fiber: 8.9g
Apx. weight: 40g/1.41oz

Very Berry Smoothie

trail smoothie

You’ll need:
1 cup frozen mixed berries
1 banana
2 tablespoons wheat berries or rolled oats
2/3 cup orange juice

At home:
Combine all the ingredients in a blender.
Process at high speed until smooth and frothy.
Spread on dehydrator tray covered with a non-stick sheet or parchment paper.
Dehydrate at 115F/46C  for about 6-12 hours until completely dry and brittle.
Remove from dehydrator and let cool to room temperature.
Grind dried smoothie mixture in a coffee grinder into a fine powder.
Pack in a small zip lock bag.

On the trail:
Pour smoothie powder into a mug or wide-mouth @Nalgene bottle.
Add 2/3 cup water and stir/shake well.
Let stand for 5 minutes to rehydrate.

Nutrition: 298KCal, Carbs: 68.1g, Fat: 1.9g, Protein: 4.8g, Sodium: 3mg, Sugars: 38.4g, Dietary Fiber: 9.4g
Apx. weight: 40g/1.41oz

More Smoothie Recipes:

Peach Cobbler Smoothie
Raspberry Peach Breakfast Smoothie
Blueberry Chocolate Smoothie

13 Comments

  1. [email protected] on January 1, 2018 at 8:13 am

    Hi there, I’ve made your mango, berry and choc smoothies and was wondering if you had any suggestions to making them sligthly sweeter? I know that doesn’t make themas healthy or nutrious, I just have a sweet tooth and get sick of oats constantly for breakfast and was hoping you could help.

    • Tanya Krezevska on January 3, 2018 at 2:03 pm

      To make it sweeter, you can add to the dry mixture stevia powder or you can also add a bit honey to the the rehydrated smoothie.

  2. Weasel on October 3, 2017 at 1:15 am

    Oooh, I want to try these. On my last PCT thru-hike attempt, I ended up drinking a carnation shake every morning with Nido and coffee powder. I’d love to shake it up with these 😀

    • Tanya Krezevska on October 3, 2017 at 8:38 am

      Thank you! I found that smoothies I’ve made from ready fruit powders rehydrate better and have silky texture. Homemade dehydrated are a bit gritty, but edible anyway 🙂

  3. Jerry Wright on November 17, 2016 at 4:30 pm

    Hey Tanya,

    Any chance getting these into the app? I don’t always have internet on the trail.

    • Tanya Krezevska on November 21, 2016 at 11:19 am

      Hi Jerry! You can add an info about all your favorite no-cook foods into Trail Chef app >> http://www.trail-chef.com

  4. Rick on May 31, 2016 at 6:28 pm

    The mango smoothie recipe is listed as weighing approx 40g and containing Carbs: 42.4g, Fat: 46.9g, Protein: 5.8g, There’s definitely a math error in there. Do you know the actual weight?

    • Tanya Krezevska on May 31, 2016 at 6:34 pm

      Hi,Rick! There no math errors. The nutritional info was calculated on fresh, non-dehydrated smoothie and it’s correct because it stays same as after dehydration. Weight shown in the recipe is for the dried, packed and ready-for-the trail meal.

      • Rick on June 1, 2016 at 4:35 pm

        That’s still not possible. Even with all the water removed, something that weighs 40g can not contain over 90g of carbs, fat, and protein!

        I’ll be making some of these today / tonight and see if I can come up with my own nutritional info.

        • Tanya Krezevska on June 1, 2016 at 4:43 pm

          Hi, Rick! As I mentioned before, the nutritional info was calculated on fresh or rehydrated smoothie which weights around 300g/10.50oz. You’ll not consume it dry, right? You can use Calorie Count Program to analyze recipe and check nutritional value: https://www.caloriecount.com/cc/account/index.php

  5. Stefanie Schori on May 9, 2016 at 8:40 pm

    Is there a reason why you dehydrate it on such a low temperature? What happened if I dry it one level higher?
    Just getting started with my dehydrator…

    • Tanya Krezevska on May 9, 2016 at 9:56 pm

      Hi Stefanie! The reason I’ve used such a low temperature is my attempt to preserve vital nutrients as enzymes and vitamins. You can dry smoothie at 135F/57C.

  6. Alyssa on March 27, 2016 at 12:53 am

    Neat idea. I did not, however, have any luck with these rehydrating properly. They created more of a gritty juice, no matter how well I powdered the smoothie “bark”.

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